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Author: guest(7 2 0 5)
Created: 2018-10-23 12:11:27
=Cornetto advert - Surprise=
Categories: <category>Gender</category>

==Description==
Unilever's "other" ice cream brand (next to magnum)showed a advert in 2014 that cause some upheaval. In a semi-classic setting ("It's now or never") a bikini-clad brunette girl approaches a guy lounging in swim trunks about to enjoy a Cornetto ice cream cone. She sings: "New Wall's Cornetto...give it to me!" as three of his buddies sitting nearby look over in awe at the gorgeous woman singing to their friends. He replies: "What's in it for me?" in a deep voice as she then tells him: "I'm a man!" Then she sings: "Surprise, Surprise! Give me Cornetto and..." as she holds out her hand and whispers: "I won't tell the guys!". At the time, five angry viewers complained about this ad to Ofcom - the British body responsible for standards of taste and decency in British TV advertising. They said that the advert contained a "negative message that being a transsexual or being associated with one was something to be ashamed of". Ofcom spoke with the ad agency which said "The intended humour was the man's surprise when the woman revealed her past, in the context of getting his Cornetto. It added that the overriding strategy of the Walls Cornetto campaign was to depict ice cream in the context of modern love scenarios. A man being attracted to a woman (who was once a man) was seen to be an example of a contemporary situation that is increasingly possible in mainstream society".
Further, the agency said: "The BACC said the transsexual character was shown to have the upper hand and was not portrayed in an obviously negative light and that the joke was on the male friend. It felt that the humour was to some extent the awkwardness of mistaken identity rather than any cruel attempt to ridicule transsexuals. It added that generally, the appearance of a transsexual theme in advertising could be seen as a sign of society's increasing acceptance. Consequently, barring such humour would be a regrettable backward step. On clearing the advert, it felt it was unlikely to cause serious or widespread offence!". The complaint was not upheld; Ofcom explained that they did not feel that the advertisement "over-stepped the mark".
*<a href=http//www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kP9vJGUjyQ>Cornetto - Surprise</a>
Color Meanings: New Text, Changed Text, Deleted Text,

Cornetto advert - Surprise

Categories:Gender

Description

Unilevers "other" ice cream brand (next to magnum)showed a advert in 2014 that cause some upheaval. In a semi-classic setting ("Its now or never") a bikini-clad brunette girl approaches a guy lounging in swim trunks about to enjoy a Cornetto ice cream cone. She sings: "New Walls Cornetto...give it to me!" as three of his buddies sitting nearby look over in awe at the gorgeous woman singing to their friends. He replies: "Whats in it for me?" in a deep voice as she then tells him: "Im a man!" Then she sings: "Surprise, Surprise! Give me Cornetto and..." as she holds out her hand and whispers: "I wont tell the guys!". At the time, five angry viewers complained about this ad to Ofcom - the British body responsible for standards of taste and decency in British TV advertising. They said that the advert contained a "negative message that being a transsexual or being associated with one was something to be ashamed of". Ofcom spoke with the ad agency which said "The intended humour was the mans surprise when the woman revealed her past, in the context of getting his Cornetto. It added that the overriding strategy of the Walls Cornetto campaign was to depict ice cream in the context of modern love scenarios. A man being attracted to a woman (who was once a man) was seen to be an example of a contemporary situation that is increasingly possible in mainstream society".
Further, the agency said: "The BACC said the transsexual character was shown to have the upper hand and was not portrayed in an obviously negative light and that the joke was on the male friend. It felt that the humour was to some extent the awkwardness of mistaken identity rather than any cruel attempt to ridicule transsexuals. It added that generally, the appearance of a transsexual theme in advertising could be seen as a sign of societys increasing acceptance. Consequently, barring such humour would be a regrettable backward step. On clearing the advert, it felt it was unlikely to cause serious or widespread offence!". The complaint was not upheld; Ofcom explained that they did not feel that the advertisement "over-stepped the mark".